Tales from Lower School

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How to Talk to Kids About Tragedies

A message from Lower School Director Alison Rothschild

In the Lower School, teachers have begun to discuss disaster relief projects with students.  As an institution committed to developing empathy and social consciousness in all of our students, conversations about collection efforts provide a developmentally appropriate avenue for this area of our work.

The focus of our conversations has been around loss and damage to material things, and our desire to help children replace those lost and damaged things.  Age appropriate conversations begin and end with reassurance that children are safe. As kids get older (7-, 8-, 9-years-old) they are able to extrapolate that there was also loss of life, but that has not been the focus of our conversations in school.

The responses to the conversations have varied tremendously, with some children enthusiastically offering to give away their toys and books while our youngest students, who are not yet able to understand another perspective, listen to the discussions and follow up with their own experiences with rain, water, toys or electricity.

I trust our teachers implicitly to provide safe and comfortable dialogue around these topics, but wanted to provide parents with some guidelines and some helpful resources to help navigate these and (sadly) future tragic events.

First and foremost, it is best to limit exposure to these events. Graphic images on the news or in photographs can be traumatic for young children. Children should have varying degrees of information, depending on age and maturity. 

It's been my experience that in times of trouble, young children seem to hold it together during the school day and then process fears, sadness and other emotions at home with their family, often at bedtime.  It's important to give children the opportunity to express their fears, ask questions, and then provide them with the reassurance that they are safe.

Here are two resources that may be of interest. 

As I think about all of the events transpiring around the world, I am increasingly appreciative of our Calhoun family.  We are all so fortunate to be part of such a kind and compassionate community. And I'm encouraged and thankful that our children are learning, right from the start, that they have the ability to help others in need.

Posted by Anonymous in kindergarten, 3's, 1st grade, 4th grade, 5th grade, 2nd grade, community on Thursday October 26 at 02:01PM
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Little Calhouners Rally for Disaster Relief in Puerto Rico

by Priscilla Marrero, Lower School Spanish teacher

In an effort to respond to hurricane victims, the Lower School community rallied together in an amazing showing of support for the children of Puerto Rico. Over the course of a week, we collected donations of books, pens, crayons, new pajamas and stuffed animals for the Bel Esprit Cultural Institute’s Rise and Read project, which unites with teachers on the ground to restore a sense of normalcy for children while the adults focus on rebuilding.

It was a wonderful, magical week full of so much community support at Little Calhoun: from coordinating ideas and talking with the children about the hurricanes in Puerto Rico to creating bookmarks and sorting the boxes full of donations. It was a real communal effort, and it was incredible to witness and be a part of it all!

Our bookmarks made by 3's –2nd graders, teachers and staff

We had a special donation from our local Stationary and Toy World on 72nd Street. Donna, the owner, gave us pens, crayons, and boxes of composition books – she even sent over her staff to deliver in person!

Some of our students were so eager to participate that they joined me in the theater to help sort and receive collections. Thank you Daisy and Javier!

Emerson was so eager to support that he told his mom that he wanted to make 100 more bookmarks for the children in Puerto Rico! He really enjoyed learning about the process of creating for others.

Thanks to Avy (Calhoun parent) and Elyna (Calhoun kindergarten student), the donations are headed to Brooklyn to meet Kafayat Alli-Balogun, founder of the Bel Esprit Cultural Institute, and go to Puerto Rico!

Thank you to everyone for their kindness and generosity in contributing to this project! What an awesome week!

Posted by Anonymous in kindergarten, 3's, 4's, collaboration, 1st grade, 2nd grade, social justice, community on Thursday October 26
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Observation & Classification--In Silence!

First Graders Become Scientists

by Barbara Ackerman, LS science teacher, 74th Street.

In 1st grade science, we achieve the impossible--a lesson taught in total silence!  No words; only gestures and actions. 

With an apparently random bunch of objects placed on a table (colorful Legos, buttons, pom-poms, beads and feathers), we silently and thoughtfully begin to sort the items into groups. At first the students are a bit puzzled, but soon, after some careful observation, a pattern emerges.

Silently begin sorting objects by color. The exercise is then repeated, this time sorting by texture.  As the children begin to realize the parameters of the groupings, they are invited to help in sorting. Before long, all of the students are working as a team to gleefully sort all of the objects on the table, still (mostly!) in silence.

The science lesson of the day: Classification. 

To end the lesson, the students are given a sheet with all sorts of seemingly random objects.  It is up to the children to classify these objects, based on characteristics of their own choosing.  There are many possibilities:  Alive and Not Alive.  Animal and Not Animal.  Wheels and No Wheels.  The possibilities seem endless . . .We have a discussion about why scientists classify. 

Scientists classify by all sorts of characteristics so they can find things more easily and help organize fields of study.  We talk about how we use classification at home, as well: socks in the sock drawer, Legos in the Lego bin.  You certainly wouldn’t want to keep your underwear with your shoes!

Directly after our science lesson on classification, the children enjoyed a snack.  A potpourri of items were offered:  veggie sticks, grapes, chips and crackers.  Without any prompting, the children began sorting their snack into groups, saying “We are doing classification!”

Posted by Anonymous in 1st grade, science on Sunday March 13, 2016 at 11:57AM
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Lower School 74
Lower School 81

Main Building 3rd - 12th Grades 433 West End Avenue New York, NY 10024 212.497.6500

Robert L. Beir Lower School Building 2.8 Years - 2nd Grade 160 West 74th Street New York, NY 10023 212.497.6550

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