Tales from Lower School

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What Does 100 Look Like?

Calhoun students celebrated the annual 100th Day Museum to commemorate completing 100 days of school. Each cluster worked together to create projects that reflected their understanding of what the number 100 looks like.

This year’s 100th Day Museum was full of interdisciplinary projects that made connections between math and other fields: from a scientific model of a 100-tentacled jellyfish, to an interpretation of a Kandinsky painting. Community service was also a common theme, with some clusters showing collections of donated books or canned goods for a local food pantry.

All of the projects were put on display in the 74th Street theater, and the entire Little Calhoun community dropped by to enjoy the creations.  Bravo to this year’s exhibitors!

Second graders made a scientific model of the 100-tentacled immortal jellyfish. Each of the 100 tentacles had an equation that equaled the number 100. The project reinforced concepts of biology, while helping students practice math skills such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, cubed numbers and factorials.

Using the painting Squares with Concentric Circles as inspiration, second graders created 100 paper squares layered with colored circles to mimic the color study by Wassily Kandinski in 1913.

100 food items that were collected for the local food pantry West Side Campaign Against Hunger.

A collection of 100 books donated to Project Cicero, a non-profit organization that creates and supplements classroom libraries in under-resourced New York City public schools.

First graders created artistic renditions of favorite Pocket People foods. Each child made 10 of one type of food, which they will later add to their Pocket Person’s home.

One group of second graders made a representation of 100 words that they can read, write and spell.

3’s students counted from one to 10 in 10 different languages. Each language was chosen because of its connection to the languages of the families and teachers in the cluster. Many of these preschoolers are bilingual and have been teaching their classmates how to count in different languages.

First graders drew, cut and painted 100 eagle feathers. After counting by groups of 10’s to make sure they had exactly 100 feathers, they then sorted the feathers by colors and divided them into two groups of 50.

First graders posed with their project of 100 paper flowers.

4’s students created a centipede with 100 legs.



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Painting a Picture with Words: 2nd Graders Embark on Writer’s Workshop

by Giovanni Pucci


Papers are strewn about as if on a literary battlefield … tables are covered with copies of rough and final drafts; blank pages hang upon the lips of tables … are we in the pressroom of The New York Times? No, we’re in my second grade classroom, where students are working on transforming the edited drafts of their personal narratives into a finished manuscript.

In second grade, Calhoun students learn to go through the formal writing process as part of Writer’s Workshop. Though all writers approach their craft differently, as a cluster we have been working on five key steps: pre-writing, or thinking of an idea; writing a first draft; reading and revising the first draft; editing the work for spelling, punctuation and other mistakes; and publishing, which could either mean turning it into a book, or simply reading the piece aloud to the other students in our cluster.

In addition to focusing on the different steps of the writing process, we have spent a lot of time learning about story structure. Stories, we discussed, can be broken down into three major parts: the beginning, the middle and the end. We took a closer look at books we had read in class to understand the role of each of these parts in telling the story. Then, students put this new understanding to work as they created short, focused pieces that intentionally touched on the essential three parts of a story.

We’ve also explored the importance of adding detail to our writing. Our goal in writing is to capture the experience on the page as if painting a picture with words. One day we drew a house together that started out as a basic pentagon shape. Little by little we added lines to make windows, then window frames, and other small details that make the drawing look like a real house. We talked about how writing is like that, too – the more details you can add, the more you can make your lived experience come to life.

Lately we have been applying these lessons to write our own personal narratives. We use what we learned about story structure as a roadmap through the writing process, and do our best to add descriptive details to our sentences that will draw a reader into the world of our narratives. Writing these narratives is an individual journey, but the small class size allows for a lot of one-on-one time with each child. At Calhoun, we are always personalizing how we teach writing so that a child feels that the work he or she is being asked to do is both possible and exciting to them.

Writing is a long process, and it can be easy for young writers to tire of it. But an interesting phenomenon can be observed in our classroom: the more time and energy that children have invested in their pieces, the more excited they feel to work on them. These second graders are seeing just how fruitful all their effort can be, and as they near the finish line, they are beginning to sense that they have created something special and beautiful. It won’t be long before it’s time for a publishing party!

Posted by Anonymous in 2nd grade, writing, language arts on Tuesday May 2, 2017 at 03:44PM
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Main Building 3rd - 12th Grades 433 West End Avenue New York, NY 10024 212.497.6500

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